Stuck in someone else's frames? break free! Easter with Spike and Jamie - this page contains Ham information for the Holiday.

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Ham Information Disk 182

 

1. How much ham should I buy?
2. What's the best way to bake a ham?
3. How long should I bake a fresh ham?
4. How long should I bake a smoked ham?
5. When and how should I add a glaze?
6. What's the best way to carve a ham?
7. Ham Information
8. What is Ham?
9. Types of Ham
10. Choosing a Ham
11. Storing Ham
12. Cooking Ham
13. HAM BUYING CONSIDERATIONS
 

 

 

1.  How much ham should I buy?
Allow 1/3 to 1/2 lb. per serving for bone-in ham and 1/4 to 1/3 lb. per serving for boneless ham.

 

 

 

2.  What's the best way to bake a ham?
  • Preheat the oven. Place the ham, fat side up, on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. Insert a meat thermometer so that the tip reaches the center of the thickest part of ham, but does not rest in fat or on bone. Do not add water or cover.
  • Bake, using the Timetable below, to desired degree of doneness.

 

 

 

3.  How long should I bake a fresh ham?
To bake a fresh ham, follow these time and temperature guidelines:


Cut of Meat

 Weight

Minutes to Cook


Fresh Ham Leg, Bone-In  
Roast at 350°F.


12 to 16           


160°F. (medium)
     
170°F. (well)

22 to 26
                     


Fresh Ham Leg, Boneless
Roast at 350°F.


5 to 8

160°F. (medium)
170°F. (well)

35 to 40

4.  How long should I bake a smoked ham?
To bake a smoked ham, follow these time and temperature guidelines:

   

Ham-Cook Before Eating
   
  Whole (boneless)
  Whole (bone-in)
  Half (boneless)
  Portion (boneless)
Roast at 325°F.



8 to 12
  
14 to 16
7 to 8
3 to 5

165°F.
                     


17 to 21
                           
18 to 20
22 to 25
35 to 40

Ham-Fully Cooked
  Whole (boneless)
  Whole (bone-in)
  Half (boneless)
  Half (bone-in)
  Portion (bone-in)
Roast at 325°F.



8 to 12
14 to 16
4 to 6
7 to 8
3 to 4

130 to 140°F.


15 to 18
15 to 18
18 to 25
18 to 25
27 to 33

Arm Picnic Shoulder
  Cook before eating 
  Fully cooked
Roast at 325°F.


5 to 8
5 to 8



165°F.
140°F.


30 to 35
25 to 30

 

 

 

5.  When and how should I add a glaze?
To glaze baked ham, pour drippings from the pan; discard the drippings. If necessary, trim the fat, leaving only a thin layer on the ham. Score the ham by cutting diamond shapes about 1/4-inch deep through the fat. If desired, insert 1 whole clove in each diamond. Spoon glaze over the ham. Return to oven; bake on additional 15 to 20 minutes.

 

 

 

6.  What's the best way to carve a ham?
  • Place the ham fat side up on a carving surface. Remove a few slices from the thin side, forming a base on which to set the meat.
  • Turn the meat onto the base.
  • Cut slices down to the leg bone.
  • To release slices, run the knife horizontally along the bone. For additional servings, turn the meat over to its original position and slice it in a similar manner.

 

7.  Ham Information

 

8. What is Ham?

Ham comes from the rear leg of the pork carcass. Not all the cured product from the pork carcass is ham. The picnic (cured lower portion of the front leg), bacon (cured belly), and Canadian bacon (cured loin) are not considered ham.

In curing, sodium nitrite, salt, and sugar are mixed with water to form a "brine" or curing solution. This solution is then "pumped" into the ham for uniform distribution of the brine. After several days of curing, the product is washed free of excess brine, cooked, and sometimes smoked. This process is known as a commercial cure.

Processors are inspected continuously by the USDA to make sure the finished product does not contain more than 200 parts per million nitrite. However, processors may, in response to customer desires, vary salt and sugar proportions, length and method of curing, smoking, and other processing techniques to produce a product that is unique to their particular brand.

 

 

 

9. Types of Ham

Fresh vs. Cured

The "uncured ham" should be labeled "pork leg" (fresh ham) and is hereafter referred to as "fresh ham." If the hind leg is to be cured, it may be a commercial cure as described above or a country cure. Country cured hams are prepared with a dry cure. After a long and expensive curing and aging period, the country ham is sold to consumers who desire the special flavor, dryness, and saltiness of the product.

Canned vs. Uncanned

Both canned and uncanned hams are sold. If you buy a canned ham, the weight quoted will be the net weight; that is, the ham weight excluding the can.

Bone-in vs. Boneless

Hams may be sold intact including all bones. However, some people do not use ham bones, and most people are not proficient in carving and may prefer a boneless ham. Bone-in hams are always uncanned, whereas boneless hams may be canned or uncanned.

Half vs. Portion

Some bone-in hams are large and thus are reduced in size. If a ham is cut in half, the resulting products should be sold as a rump half and a shank half. If one or more of the meaty center slices is removed and sold separately, the resulting products should be sold as a rump portion and a shank portion. A shank portion will have more connective tissue than a rump portion.

Regular vs. Additional Water

The brine used in curing is, of course, mostly water. The large amount of water uniformly distributes the curing ingredients throughout the ham in a short period of time. During the curing, smoking, and cooking processes, all of the added water is normally lost. However, some hams do not lose all of the water from the brine. USDA regulations require processors to label hams with different names if more than a normal amount of water is retained after processing.

Perishable vs. Nonperishable

All uncanned hams are perishable and must be refrigerated at all times by retailers and consumers. Most canned hams are perishable and also must be kept under refrigeration. The are labeled "Perishable: keep under refrigeration." Some canned hams are pasteurized and do not require refrigeration. Such hams may be stored at room temperature almost indefinitely since the product is sterile and recontamination is not possible unless the can is opened, punctured, or torn. Such products are usually, but not always, labeled "Does not require refrigeration." When in doubt, always refrigerate.

 

 

 

10. Choosing a Ham

Fresh hams with a desirable color are characterized as bright grayish-pink. Fresh hams that display a pale, soft, and watery appearance are less desirable. Although these hams appear to contain less fat, they shrink more upon cooking and thus tend to be less juicy. Fresh hams that have been stored too long at 40F or higher are usually slightly greenish because of the effect growing bacteria have upon the muscle.

Cured hams display a characteristic pink cured color. Improper curing results in a light and/or non-uniform cured color. When the ham surface is exposed to certain lights during retail display, the bright pink cured color changes to a faded color. Upon exposure to light and/or prolonged storage at 40F or higher, the faded pink surface turns to a faded green. Select bright pink cured hams.

The cut and exposed surface of a ham (or ham slice) sometimes displays a rainbow of colors. This rainbow of color may be due to microbial growth. The more likely cause of this phenomenon is the spreading of the cooked white fat present in meat over the surface of the lean during slicing. The white fat is reflecting to the eye all the rays of the spectrum combined.

Marbling is the visible specks of fat within a muscle. Marbling contributes to pork flavor and, to a lesser extent, to juiciness and tenderness. However, hams with excessive marbling tend to taste greasy. Select hams with a small to modest amount of marbling for optimum flavor.

Should you buy a ham which has additional water? This decision depends upon eating preference and/or price. Some consumers prefer the extra juiciness provided by the additional water. Others do not. Hams with additional water normally sell for a lower price per pound as purchased than regular ham. The amount of extra water in Ham With Natural Juices and Ham Water Added is approximately 5 and 10 percent, respectively.

 

 

 

11. Storing Ham

When in doubt, refrigerate hams at all times. The storage temperature should be 32F. Only genuine country cured hams and pasteurized canned hams labeled "Does not require refrigeration" can be stored safely without refrigeration.

If the temperature of your refrigerator is set at 32F, cured ham slices and boneless, uncanned ham can be stored easily for a week. Shank and rump portions and halves can be stored easily for 2 weeks. Intact, bone-in, smoked, whole hams can be stored for a month. In all cases, make sure the product is covered with a moisture-proof wrapping material to prevent dehydration. Discard any ham with a distinct spoiled odor and greenish appearance.

Perishable, unopened canned hams can be stored in the refrigerator indefinitely. Once opened and partially used, store the remainders as long as you would a boneless, uncanned ham.

Don't freeze canned hams as purchased. Remove the ham from the can and wrap with a high quality freezer wrap. Uncanned hams may be frozen if wrapped tightly in a high quality freezer wrap. Storage for more than 2 months usually results in a loss of the desirable flavor normally associated with high quality unfrozen ham.

After the meal, always refrigerate any leftovers immediately! You do not need to wait for the leftovers to "cool down," since that is the purpose of refrigeration.

 

 

 

12. Cooking Ham

Ham cookery requires an accurate meat thermometer. Place it in the thickest portion, being careful not to insert the tip in a fat pocket or against the bone. Cook hams to the following internal temperatures:

Type Internal Temperature Fresh (uncured) 170F Cured, "uncooked" 160F Cured, "fully cooked" 140F, or serve cold if you prefer

If you purchase a bone-in ham, you should be fairly proficient in carving, especially if you are serving to company. Always cut across the grain (muscle fibers) when possible for best results.

 

 

 

13.  HAM BUYING CONSIDERATIONS:

* PERISHIBLE VS. NONPERISHABLE:
All noncanned hams are perishable and must be refrigerated at
all times by retailers and consumers. Most canned hams are
perishable and also must be kept under refrigeration. The are
labeled "Perishable: keep under refrigeration." Some canned
hams are pasteurized and do not require refrigeration. Such
hams may be stored at room temperature almost indefinitely
since the product is sterile and recontamination is not possible
unless the can is opened, punctured, or torn. Such products are
usually, but not always, labeled "Does not require refrigeration."
When in doubt, always refrigerate. 

* CANNED VS. NONCANNED:
Both canned and noncanned hams are sold. If you buy a canned
ham, the weight quoted will be the net weight; that is, the ham
weight excluding the can. 

* BONE-IN VS. BONELESS:
Hams may be sold intact including all bones. However, some
people do not use ham bones, and most people are not proficient
in carving and may prefer a boneless ham. Bone-in hams are
always noncanned, whereas boneless hams may be canned or
noncanned. 

 

 

SHALOM FROM SPIKE & JAMIE

 

SHALOM FROM SPIKE & JAMIE


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Spike's & Jamie's Recipes

Spike.Jamie

 

 

 

 ~APPLE PIE BAKED IN AN APPLE~

5-6 Granny Smith apples (make sure they can stand on their own)
1 tbsp. cinnamon
1/4 cup sugar
1 tbsp. brown sugar
pie crust (homemade or pre-made)

1) Preheat oven to 375F.

2) Cut off the top of 4 apples off and discard. Remove the inside of each apple with a spoon or melon baller very carefully, as to not puncture the peel.

If youre a skilled interior apple excavator, salvage as much as you can so you can use it for Step 2. I, on the other hand, am not skilled so I just had to throw my interior apples away and chop up additional apples for filling.

3) Remove skin from remaining apple(s) and slice very thinly. These apple pieces will give you the additional filling needed to fill the four apples you are baking.

Mix sliced apples with sugars and cinnamon in a bowl. If you prefer more or less cinnamon make adjustments as desired. Same goes for the sugar.

Scoop sliced apples into hollow apples.

4) Roll out pie crust and slice into 1/4 inch strips. You can also add a strip of pastry inside the top of the apple almost like a liner to add a little more texture/sweetness to the pie.

Cover the top of the apple in a lattice pattern with pie crust strips.

5) Place apples in an 88 pan. Add just enough water to the cover the bottom of the pan.

Cover with foil and bake for 20-25 minutes.

Remove foil and bake for an additional 20 minutes or until crust is golden brown and sliced apples are soft.

Makes 4 baked apple pies (in the apple).
*Channing

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It is with great sadness that
I inform our viewers that
Spike left this world
June 2008.

We who love her miss her greatly.

 


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